Figures of Speech Writing Challenge

(Based on The Elements of Eloquence by Mark Forsyth)

Here’s something Forsyth inspired me to make to experiment with style and see what to add or remove from my writing toolbox.

For each of the figures of speech, try writing a few sentences (or more) using it. If you have the book, that’ll be handy since it has many examples of each type to get you thinking. Otherwise, a browser search plus the book’s Wikipedia page will be handy. Try not to focus on writing the best possible responses as much as practicing it and getting a feel for how it sounds in your writing. Good luck!

  1. Alliteration
  2. Polyptoton
  3. Antithesis
  4. Merism
  5. Blazon
  6. Synesthesia
  7. Aposiopesis
  8. Hyperbaton
  9. Anadiplosis
  10. Periodic sentences
  11. Hypotaxis and Parataxis
  12. Diacope
  13. Rhetorical Questions
  14. Hendiadys
  15. Epistrophe
  16. Tricolon
  17. Epizeuxis
  18. Syllepsis
  19. Isocolon
  20. Enallage
  21. Versification
  22. Zeugma
  23. Paradox
  24. Chiasmus
  25. Assonance
  26. The Fourteenth Rule
  27. Catachresis
  28. Litotes
  29. Metonymy and Synecdoche
  30. Transferred Epithets
  31. Pleonasm
  32. Epanalepsis
  33. Personification
  34. Hyperbole
  35. Adynaton
  36. Prolepsis
  37. Congeries
  38. Scesis Onomaton
  39. Anaphora

(Cross-posted from my other writing-focused blog)

Image credit: Pexels

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The Glorious Twenty-Fifth of May

Today is May 25th, the day Terry Pratchett fans wear the lilac as a reference to his beloved Discworld series (and also, more recently, in honor of the author and other Alzheimer’s patients). It is also, quite wonderfully coincidentally, Towel Day for Douglass Adams fans (author of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series) and, as Jack reminded me, World Tarot Day. Let me take a moment to remind you, in case you forgot: DON’T PANIC.

But for me, this day is particularly special.

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Revisiting Stories: Bitterblue

From my past experiences of reading books and watching movies, I know that I tend to intensely identify with one or two of the characters. Sometimes I think about how they would behave in my life situations and how I would in theirs. I don’t think this habit is all that uncommon, but if you want to read up more on it, see exhibits A and B.

This post, in contrast to the thousands of reviews on Kristen Cashore’s Bitterblue novel, explores the connection I developed while reading this book a few years ago and my recent re-reading to explore why it affected me so strongly. Rather than focus on the plot, I’m focusing more on the points of personal connection as a bit of a psychological exercise.

Slight Spoilers Ahead!
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“Work” – Kahlil Gibran

Work_Kahlil Gibran_640x800

“Work is love made visible…
For if you bake bread with indifference,
You bake a bitter bread
that feeds but half man’s hunger.
And if you grudge the crushing of the grapes,
Your grudge distills a poison
in the wine.
And if you sing as though angels,
and love not the singing,
You muffle man’s ears
to the voices of the day
and the voices of the night.”

From The Prophet, by Kahlil Gibran