Figures of Speech Writing Challenge

(Based on The Elements of Eloquence by Mark Forsyth)

Here’s something Forsyth inspired me to make to experiment with style and see what to add or remove from my writing toolbox.

For each of the figures of speech, try writing a few sentences (or more) using it. If you have the book, that’ll be handy since it has many examples of each type to get you thinking. Otherwise, a browser search plus the book’s Wikipedia page will be handy. Try not to focus on writing the best possible responses as much as practicing it and getting a feel for how it sounds in your writing. Good luck!

  1. Alliteration
  2. Polyptoton
  3. Antithesis
  4. Merism
  5. Blazon
  6. Synesthesia
  7. Aposiopesis
  8. Hyperbaton
  9. Anadiplosis
  10. Periodic sentences
  11. Hypotaxis and Parataxis
  12. Diacope
  13. Rhetorical Questions
  14. Hendiadys
  15. Epistrophe
  16. Tricolon
  17. Epizeuxis
  18. Syllepsis
  19. Isocolon
  20. Enallage
  21. Versification
  22. Zeugma
  23. Paradox
  24. Chiasmus
  25. Assonance
  26. The Fourteenth Rule
  27. Catachresis
  28. Litotes
  29. Metonymy and Synecdoche
  30. Transferred Epithets
  31. Pleonasm
  32. Epanalepsis
  33. Personification
  34. Hyperbole
  35. Adynaton
  36. Prolepsis
  37. Congeries
  38. Scesis Onomaton
  39. Anaphora

(Cross-posted from my other writing-focused blog)

Image credit: Pexels

Advertisements

Story Hospital on NaNoWriMo and First Drafts

Looking like a finished work isn’t what a first draft is for. It’s a tool to help you tell the story.

via NaNoWriMo: Why “Bad” First Drafts Are Great — Story Hospital

(I thought I’d share a link to this post now that we’re closer to the end of the month. It has many good pointers about not being disappointed in the first draft of a story. It also applies to the first drafts of many types of writing in general. Best of luck with everything this week! – Cinnia)